Flora - with a view

"A weed is a plant in the wrong place, or too much of it in the right place."

All images and descriptions - Kerry O'Connor 

Dog Rose

Dog Rose

Rosa canina - on the track from Shepherd's Cottage to Old Sarum (seen in the distance) June 2020 Kerry O'Connor

Greater Knapweed

Greater Knapweed

Centurea scabiosa - on Old looking towards New Sarum June 2020 Kerry O'Connor

Pyramidal Orchid

Pyramidal Orchid

Anacamptis pyramidalis in the verge of the road to Little Durnford June 2020 Kerry O'Connor

Poppies

Poppies

Papaver rhoeas at Leisure Centre car park June 2020 Kerry O'Connor

Wild Turnip

Wild Turnip

Wild Turnip, Brassica rapa, on Old looking down on New Sarum. It is grown for the root vegetable or seed oil. May 2020

Bird's Foot trefoil

Bird's Foot trefoil

Bird's-foot trefoil, Lotus corniculatus, on Old looking down on New Sarum. It is a member of the Pea family and the yellow and orange flowers give it the common name of Eggs and Bacon. May 2020

Salad Burnet

Salad Burnet

Salad Burnet, Poterium sanguisorba, on Old looking down on New Sarum. It is a member of the Rose family and leaves and flowers are edible. May 2020

Rock rose

Rock rose

Rock rose, Helianthemum nummularium, on Old looking down on New Sarum. It is an evergreen shrub, not a rose and the five petal flowers close at night. May 2020

Hound's-tongue

Hound's-tongue

Hound's-tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) is a member of the borage family that gets its names (common and Genus) from the roughness of the leaves. The beetroot red flowers usually face downward and never fully open which does nothing to help photography. It has an unpleasant smell and can be poisonous to grazing livestock. Seen here on the western slopes of Old Sarum with Dean Farm in the distance and Avon Farm in the far distance. Image: Kerry O'Connor May 2020

Rosy Garlic on the verge opposite Tybalt

Rosy Garlic on the verge opposite Tybalt

Allium roseum (Rosy Garlic) growing in the verge here opposite Tybalt is an edible (flowers raw, leaves and bulb raw or cooked) garden escapee loved by butterflies but hated by squirrel and deer. Image: Kerry O'Connor May 2020

Bluebells over Old Sarum

Bluebells over Old Sarum

With the spire of Salisbury Cathedral on the skyline, this starts a new season of images April 2020

Teasel

Teasel

Dipsacus fullonum has been used for a blue dye and as a comb to clean and raise a nap on wool. July 2019

St John's Wort

St John's Wort

Hypericum can be used to treat depression but can interfere with many conventional drugs, making some reach toxic levels eg serotonin reuptake inhibitors anti depressants, whilst rendering others less effective eg the contraceptive pill. Old Sarum July 2019

Purple loosestrife

Purple loosestrife

Lythrum salicaria likes damp places. Its name comes from its leaves that are like willow (Salix) and turn red in autumn (Greek, bloody, lythron). It is nectar rich attracting longer tongued insects. On the banks of the Avon July 2019

Rough Hawkbit

Rough Hawkbit

Leontodon hispidus by Old Sarum Cathedral maybe a weed to us but it is nectar rich for bees. July 2019

Golden Rod (Canadian)

Golden Rod (Canadian)

Solidago canadensis on Old Sarum. Poisonous but useful for dyes. July 2019

Common (yellow) Toadflax

Common (yellow) Toadflax

Linaria vulgaris, also known as wild snapdragon, is not a true flax. Can be used for a yellow dye. The flowers were thought to resemble a toad or toad's mouth. Their lower lip has an orange line to guide bees in to land. Only larger bees with longer tongues will get in to reach the nectar. (Cathedral in the background) July 2019

Betony

Betony

Stachys officinalis, belongs to the mint (dead nettle) family and was used in churchyards and before that by the Romans to ward off evil spirits and gives a yellow / green dye. Gradidge Lane July 2019

Soapwort

Soapwort

Saponaria officinalis has vespertine flowers ie they open in the evening and leaves with three prominent veins. It is poisonous but leaves and roots can be boiled to produce soap, which was used by woollen mills. July 2019

Wild Carrot

Wild Carrot

Daucus carota on Old Sarum. July 2019

Wild Carrot

Wild Carrot

Daucus carota. The roots are white. The orange cultivars were selectively bred by the Dutch in the 17th Century as a tuber tribute to their ruling House of Orange (Nassau). When William (III) and Mary (II) came to England "gloriously" orange carrots followed. The initial N has moved from a Naranj to aN orange as has the snake from a Nadder from to aN adder over centuries of use. July 2019

Queen Anne's Lace

Queen Anne's Lace

After William came Anne (of the 2015 film the Favourite) who supposedly pricked her thumb lace-making. Wild carrot has a single red to purple central blooded flower from that prick amongst all the white and the flower is known as Queen Anne's Lace. July 2019

Collage

Collage

Collage of the 3 previous wild carrot images. July 2019

Eyebright

Eyebright

Euphrasia officinalis, is semi-parasitic on grasses but without causing them apparent harm. July 2019

Yarrow

Yarrow

Achillea millefolium, is loved by some birds for lining nests, it may reduce parasites. Achilles used it for healing wounds. Deep roots means it's drought resistant, it needs to be this summer. The flowers vary from white through pale to deep pink and the leaves when crushed give an aromatic smell. July 2019

Scabious on Old Sarum

Scabious on Old Sarum

The three scabious flowers shown all belong to the same family but different genera. The field scabious has four petals, the others five. Field is taller than and has a hairier stem than small. The Devil’s bit (top) roots look shortened as though bitten off, who else bites things underground? Old Sarum July 2019

Field Scabious

Field Scabious

Knautia arvensis. Old Sarum (cathedral spire on the skyline) July 2019

Dark Mullein

Dark Mullein

Verbascum nigrun has purple hairs on the stamens. Edible biennial. Name from German for King’s candle. Eaten by the Mullein moth caterpillar. Old Sarum July 2019

Knapweed Broomrape

Knapweed Broomrape

Orobanche has no leaves and no chlorophyll, it cannot photosynthesise and so is entirely parasitic on its host, Knapweed. Old Sarum July 2019

Knapweed Broomrape

Knapweed Broomrape

Orobanche Knapweed with its parasite Broomrape July 2019

Small Scabious

Small Scabious

Scabiosa columbaria Old Sarum July 2019

Harebell

Harebell

Campanula rotundifolia l flowers have stems so thin they seem to float above the grass. Unopened the five petals flower is dark blue, becoming lighter as it opens. Old Sarum July 2019

Goat's Beard

Goat's Beard

Tragapogon pratensis Yellow flowers close around mid day hence another name of jack go to bed at noon. The globular seed head looks like but is much bigger than a dandelion. Old Sarum July 2019

Rosebay Willowherb

Rosebay Willowherb

Epilobium angustifolium will quickly colonise ground after a fire, so is called fireweed July 2019

Hemp Agrimony

Hemp Agrimony

Eupatorium cannabinum is a perennial herb of the Daisy family, it is neither hemp nor agrimony, its leaves resemble hemp July 2019

Lady's Bedstraw

Lady's Bedstraw

Galium verum, has been used to stuff mattresses and colour Double Gloucester cheese July 2019

Willow & Meadowsweet

Willow & Meadowsweet

Meadowsweet in foreground and Willow in background, both a source of salicylate used in the production of aspirin - more information https://www.stratfordsubcastle.org.uk/avon-valley-reserve-walk-july-2019

White Campion

White Campion

Silene latifolia, can cross with red to give pink. A clove like scent at night attracts moths. Silenus was a Greek woodland god. The roots can be used as soap. May 2019.

Pyramidal Orchid

Pyramidal Orchid

Anacamptis pyramidalis, in the triangular field north of Hudson's Field and with the cathedral in the distance. June 2019

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