Devenish Nature Reserve, Little Durnford

Location details and other information about the Reserve can be found here.

Click on a thumbnail to enter the slide show and view the complete images and their descriptions. All of the images (with one exception - the Brown Hairstreak butterfly) were taken at the Reserve.

Wasp Spider (Image: Richard Death)

Wasp Spider (Image: Richard Death)

The Wasp Spider is really quite large and brightly coloured, mimicking a wasp's pattern. It isn't dangerous, but uses its strong colouring to suggest that it has a nasty sting, like a wasp, and hopes to warn predators to keep away. It builds a large orb web in long grass, to trap its favourite food of grasshoppers. It arrived in the UK in the last 10-15 years, from continental europe - probably blown on a "parachute web". It is restricted to southern England, but is making its way north.

Wasp Spider - underside

Wasp Spider - underside

Image 2 of 2 taken at the Devenish by Richard Death on 17 August 2020

Clear waymarker for the blue trail

Clear waymarker for the blue trail

There are way-marked trails to follow or simply wander around at will.

Steep steps

Steep steps

A safe way to access the higher areas of the Reserve.

One of five 'fairy doors'

One of five 'fairy doors'

There's a Fairy Trail of colourful bird boxes for younger visitors to spot.

Balwen sheep

Balwen sheep

One of the resident grass-cutters

Silver Birch

Silver Birch

Volunteers at work March 2018

Volunteers at work March 2018

Planting a mixed hedge of blackthorn, wayfarer, wild rose and wild plum to encourage Brown Hairstreak butterflies to lay their eggs in the Reserve.

Hedging whips (young plants)

Hedging whips (young plants)

FInished hedge

FInished hedge

supported by canes and protected from nibbling animals by plastic sleeves

Brown Hairstreak

Brown Hairstreak

What it is hoped the new hedge will attrack (library image)

Balwen sheep

Balwen sheep

More residents keeping the undergrowth under control.

Coppiced Hazel

Coppiced Hazel

Protected from 'nibblers' by a woven frame of branches

new growth on hazel

new growth on hazel

a year after being coppiced

Ash dieback

Ash dieback

The policy at the Reserve is to leave diseased trees alone, hopefully allowing other trees to build up a resistance.

Hemlock

Hemlock

Primroses

Primroses

Bluebells

Bluebells

Volunteers were busy planting more bluebells in the autumn of 2018

Scarlet elfcap fungus

Scarlet elfcap fungus

Bracket fungus

Bracket fungus

attractive green moss

attractive green moss

bird box

bird box

start of the trails

start of the trails

Cinnabar moth

Cinnabar moth

Cinnabar moth

Cinnabar moth

Memorial Board

Memorial Board

Judas' Ear fungus

Judas' Ear fungus

Auricularia auricula-judae, commonly known as Judas' Ear, jelly ear, wood ear, or by a number of other common names, is a species of edible fungus. Image taken 1 Jan 2019

 

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